Festive Expectations from Social Media

The most wonderful time to trim a tree is around the corner! You highlight all shows you would like to watch during holidays; you google how to cook a turkey and you wear sparkling outfits once again. When I was a child, all my memories about the festive season are sitting around stove in pyjamas and eating all kinds of foods. However, the introduction and proliferation of social media bring us new expectation in life. It’s certainly that you will see many photos posted on social media platforms about perfectly decorated landmarks, smiling families picking out trees. Certainly, our focus also shift from enjoying pleasant festival time to documenting and sharing the daily arrangements that should have been secret.

Almost all of us live daily life online, and it usually feature snapping and sharing, accompanying with how, when and where to post on social media. In order to cater the trend, more and more instagramable coffee shops spring up and and they offer flower adorned lattes to customers. Of course, the Christmas is no exception. In this year, the Covent Garden have attach the festive look to present-adorned vehicle. That photo has been shared more times than a tweet from Chissy Teigen. Dalloway Terrace books some giant bauble displays in advance, and such photos have had more coverage in last few weeks than they’ve seen all year. It’s the power of social media sharing.

For the sake of such reasons, the rest of stores are forced to decorate their displays as much as possible. Some even intends to visit festive locations and post a dozens of seconds video rather than wrapping up warm drinking and fighting way down the street. It’s noteworthy that many avid shoppers usually arm more bags than they could carry, purchasing scarves, gloves, French hat, clothes, shoes and the like. Instead, others could feel like how terrible your holiday is if you didn’t share Instagram hotspots. And it’s also true to such a condition if you didn’t buy expensive gifts like Mulberry purse for your loved ones from luxurious stores. Is it a Christmas if you haven’t posted a scene of ice rink or photographed the star on the top of the tree.

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The festival is an opportunity to enjoy with your loved ones and having the opportunity to show how much you care; it’s about having a few days away from the daily grind and wrapping up on the sofa with a box of chocolates and a cold turkey sandwich; it’s about putting on a rubbish Christmas jumper and enjoying every minute, and making sprouts out to be a delicacy rather than a vegetable that nobody gives the time of day any other month of the year. It’s about goodwill to all men, being thankful for what we have and taking some time out from the madness that precedes it.

Hat Fashion from WWI

For the sake of war, hairstyles shrunk in size and hats sit lower on the head. Design and shape of hats became quite plain. Large plumes and luxurious embellishments disappeared. At that time, one would be criticized as an unpatriotic person. And the person would be regarded as a person who was more concerned about one’s own appearance rather than the war.

In the honor of heroine of the era, the chic ideal was for youth only. When hats slipped down the head, it seems that a young girl was dressed in her mother’s style. In the following term, the crown of hats continued deepening and the cloche has been created. Sometimes, hats were sewn with brims. But most hats featuring brims were summer hats. Prior to the early 1930s, crown became more shallow, because of curled hairs, leaving them elegant and puffy. Wide-brim hats turned popular, playing an role of a parasol in scorching days in summer. But they are out of fashion right now. Mannish “fedoras” was adjusted to meet demands of women in pairing with tailored suits. At the end of the decade, crowns gone upward just like those in the 1880s.

During the wartime, an assortment of hats has been created to suit various face shapes, hairstyles and personal preferences. On both sides of Atlantic, exquisite objects brightened boring utility fashions, in spite of then policy — rationing. Actually, only hat materials were not limited by rationing. Then embellishments on hats like feathers, veiling and artificial flowers became popular. Then, bonnets, turbans and halo hats came back in brief. The latter was suitable for fashionable up-swept hairstyles, sitting on the back of the head.

During the postwar time, many women didn’t wear hats on a regular basis. To preserve its market, the millinery industry set about creating variety and extravagance. Generally speaking hats remained small and close to the head. They were now touted as the essential accessory to complete the ensemble. Alternatively, “pancake” or “cart wheel” hats sat flat atop the head reviving turn of the century styles. By the late 1950s the turban returned to fashion. As hairstyles grew in size in the early 1960s, hat styles had to adapt. In vogue were tiny poufs of veil or pillboxes that perched on the back of the head. The beret hat also takes predominant accessories of poor in a certain period.

Hat Lady

When fashions were geared for youth in the mid 1960s, headpieces fell off favour of young people. It seems that headgear were accessories of the past. Even serious decree from Catholic Church didn’t resisted the trend in 1967. Except for winter hats, fashion hat disappeared in the 1970s. In the 1980s, hat restored their status in fashion but never reached its previous peak. Princess Diana has contributed to its comeback in fashion. In recent years, many would like to bring hats back for healthier body. It is an important reason of headpieces’ comeback.

Hat Sharer: Three Women in A Boater

Although brim decreased dramatically, most hair and face of wearers were still covered by hats in the 1840s. When view from the back, the “Bavolette” seems like a ribbon frill. A main purpose of “Bavolette” is to cover an erogenous zone, during the mid 19th century. In the late 1850s, neck would expose to air only in evening dress. A brief occurred to hats as the “wide-awake” was introduced. To a certain extent, it was a relive of shepherdess hat in the 18th century. In general, shepherdess hat often features a broad brim and shadow crown.

By 1860, parasols have became a kind of fashion accessories except for clothes suitable for cold weather, purely ornaments in 1860. Owe to reduction in its functionality, bonnets became smaller in the next decade. At the start of evolution, “spoon” bonnets were named for its shallow crown. More hair and fair skin could be seen. Different with previous wide-brim hats, “spoon” bonnets feature a peaked crown with a nosegay of flowers. Compared with the bonnets, Franchon was known for its smaller size and typical triangular-shaped design. It was made of straw or silk. In general, wide ribbons occupied central stages of accessories. Hats were introduced to the wardrobe from 1860s.

Fanchon
Fanchon

From the 1870s to the 1880s, hats and bonnets were on par in fashion. Bonnets would be better if one would like to create a more modest appearance. But bonnets were often connected with a slightly obese appearance. A tall hats like a “three-storey” or “flowerpots” became popular, because good reason. Soaring crown of hats appeared just as the roof of towers. It seems like previous women riding hats in the 18th century. It was also similar to men’s hats of the same period. In the late 1890s, women wardrobes collected masculine clothes and hats through new sporting clothes and campaigns. Although both were regarded as the exclusive styles of men, “Boaters” and “Trilbys” were topped on all, except for the most formal occasions.

Amazing 20th Century

In the special era, women were fashionable when their silhouettes resembled an S-shape. The hat was critical to create a perfect silhouette of a woman. The curvy figure was carried through and pouched over the waist. In the age, another kind of hat — toque was also popular. Its name was deprived from brimless hat. Women’s silhouette turned more slender after 1908. On the contrary, hats in the term became larger. In 1911, brim of hats hit the widest status, over the width of a wearer’s shoulders. For the purpose of positioning hats on heads securely, hats pins were as long as 18 inches. In addition to its functionality, hats pins also stood out for other advantages. They could also be used to defend women themselves when they were haunted by men’s unwanted advances.

History of Women Hats

When it comes to hats, one may doubt that it is a frivolous accessory or a must have in daily life. One will find explicit answers if you look back to its history. During the Middle Ages, women were asked to cover their hair according to the church’s decree in earnest. In the 18th century, milliners promote the hat-making craftsmanship out of home and formed the millinery industry.

At present, a “milliner” refers to a person associated with the industry of hat making; in the 18th century, a “milliner” was more of a stylist. In tradition, a woman’s job included not only creating hats or bonnets, pairing with costumes, but also opting laces, trims and accessories. Dating back to the 1700s, the term “milliner” origins from Milan, Italy. At that time, straws were braided to make hats, and the finest forms and patterns were created.

Throughout the whole 18th century, pancake style “shepherdess” hit big among women. Hats in this period were varied in brim widths. For the sake of unpopularity of parasol in the term, these hats were taken as necessities to block harmful ultraviolet rays. In this manner, fair complexions could be protected. In the 1770s, the “calash” bonnet became popular when huge wigs and hairstyles swelled in Europe. At the time, collapsible bonnets were made of wood or whalebone to keep wearers away from effects of weather conditions. When walking in the wind, a front ribbon could be tied over their faces.

Calash-Bonnet
Calash Bonnet

In the 1780s, a simpler cotton fabric took the place of “calash” bonnets, representing the more democratic styles after the French Revolution. Bonnets featured simple ornaments and a separate ribbon were popular for all classes of then society. From time to time, elite worn bonnets with tall crowns and wide silk ribbon. However, hats fell from favour after the French Revolution. They were connected to upper echelons and democracy. From the 1790s to the 1820s, turbans were introduced and remained chic. Such inspirations came from boomed trade with India. Cotton was necessitated by its scarcity in Egypt and the United States, in spite of poor relationship with the U. S.

the more democratic styles after the French Revolution. Bonnets featured simple ornaments and a separate ribbon were popular for all classes of then society. From time to time, elite worn bonnets with tall crowns and wide silk ribbon. However, hats fell from favour after the French Revolution. They were connected to upper echelons and democracy. From the 1790s to the 1820s, turbans were introduced and remained chic. Such inspirations came from boomed trade with India. Cotton was necessitated by its scarcity in Egypt and the United States, in spite of poor relationship with the U. S.

Now Popular Bonnets

When it turned to the 1810s, straw bonnets were fashionable. So cheap “bonnet board” was used to create hats. For the purpose of creating new design, cardboard was pressed in a roller machine. To a certain extent, bonnet board was also a reflection of a lack of trade goods from the angle. Then Italy was the source of quality straw bonnets. It was proved that bonnets with silk covered buckram was ideal to keep its shape and show essence of design. In the 1820s, hats were ornamented with feather plumes and silk bows.

Bonnets represented to huge proportions. A large brim framed the contour of one’s face and hid profile from the side. A veil contributed to its mysterious identities, proprieties as well as delicate skin.

I will introduce more detailed historical information next time. Thanks for you reading.